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Stuttering Activities

Children with STUTTERING DISORDERS demonstrate difficulties with speech fluency.

The following questions and answers were taken from the Stuttering Foundation of America's website:

What is stuttering?

Stuttering is a communication disorder in which the flow of speech is broken by repetitions (li-li-like this), prolongations (lllllike this), or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sounds and syllables. There may also be unusual facial and body movements associated with the effort to speak.

What causes stuttering?

There are four factors most likely to contribute to the development of stuttering: genetics ( approximately 60% of those who stutter have a family member who does also); child development (children with other speech and language problems or developmental delays are more likely to stutter); neurophysiology ( recent research has shown that people who stutter process speech and language in different areas of the brain than those who do not stutter); and family dynamics ( high expectations and fast-paced lifestyles can contribute to stuttering).

Stuttering may occur when a combination of factors comes together and may have different causes in different people. It is probable that what causes stuttering differs from what makes it continue or get worse.

Click on an item below for ideas to try at home:

bullet Speaking Slowly
bulletOne word
bullet Breathing
bulletGentle Voice
bulletGentle Touch
bullet Speech Helpers
bulletKeep Moving